News, Media & Publications

Media

  • September 10, 2013
    • Veritas Bio’s RNA Delivery Patent Allowed by EPO

JUPITER, Fla.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Veritas Bio, LLC, a privately held biotechnology company is pleased to announce that the European Patent Office (EPO) has granted a patent to Veritas for European Patent Application No. 07 873 598.2 1401. The patent relates to the “In vivo Delivery of Nucleic Acids.”

Dr. Pachuk, the inventor, said, “The allowed claims cover transfecting nucleic acids into skin or muscle cells under conditions wherein nucleic acids and expression vectors encoding nucleic acids, such as, DNA siRNA, mRNA, oligonucleotides and other nucleic acid molecules are delivered to the liver. The delivery of the nucleic acid can be for treating any disease or condition of the liver. These include down regulating endogenous liver genes associated with a disease condition and the genes of liver pathogens and the promoters of these genes. The allowed claims also cover the delivery of DNA, expression vectors, mRNA and vectors encoding mRNA for gene therapy. This proprietary technology is applicable for the rapid development of RNA therapeutics for the treatment of infectious liver diseases and other liver diseases.”

“Our technology solves one of the biggest hurdles for the development of RNAi and other nucleic acid-based drugs by providing a safe and effective delivery system for effector RNA molecules and other nucleic acid molecules. This technology enables the utilization of the body’s innate delivery system to transport effector RNA molecules rather than relying on expensive synthetic, toxic, immunogenic and inefficient delivery systems, nanoparticles or viral particles for delivery.”

Humans naturally extrude exovesicles (also called exosomes) from multiple cell types including muscle and skin cells. Exovesicles are natural nanoparticles the body produces that transport molecules from one cell to another and from one tissue or organ to another. Veritas Bio’s technology enables utilization of this delivery system to organs, tissues and cells.

This new technology enables local administration to the skin or muscle, of either the effector molecules or a DNA encoding the effector molecules. The molecules are then loaded by the transfected cell into exovesicles, which are extruded from the cell and distributed to other cells in the body, to deliver them to target cells is a natural, safe and effective method of systemic delivery, without invoking the innate and adaptive immune responses to the delivery system. The exosomes can be targeted to specific cell types and tissues through the use of ligands as described in the patent.

A corresponding application has also been allowed in the US. Veritas is in the process of filing continuing applications to cover various other indications including delivery to non-liver tissues including immune cells, various types of therapeutic nucleic acid molecules and compositions in which RNA containing exovesicles are manufactured in producer cells in culture.

The Allowed Patent Application and the continuing applications are available for licensing.

Veritas Bio, LLC
Andrew B. Peltzman, 215-432-5503
andrewp@veritasbiollc.com
www.veritasbiollc.com

  • April 15, 2013
    • Veritas Bio’s RNA Delivery Patent Allowed by USPTO

Veritas Bio, LLC, a privately held biotechnology company with an Operations Facility in Jupiter, Florida is pleased to announce that the company has received a Notice of Allowance from the United States Patent and Trademark Office for U.S. Patent Application No. 12/514,237, “In Vivo Delivery Of Double Stranded RNA To a Target Cell”.

The allowed claims cover transfecting double-stranded RNA into skin or muscle cells under conditions wherein double-stranded RNA such as siRNA or shRNA is delivered to the liver for the purpose of down regulating liver pathogens. This proprietary technology is applicable for the rapid development of RNA therapeutics for the treatment of infectious liver diseases such as Hepatitis A, B and C and others.

Veritas Bio’s technology solves one of the biggest hurdles for the development of RNAi and other nucleic acid-based drugs by providing safe and effective delivery systems for effector RNA molecules. This technology enables the utilization of the body’s innate delivery system to deliver effector RNA molecules rather than reliance upon expensive chemically synthesized, inefficient, immunogenic and often toxic delivery systems and nanoparticles or viral particles for delivery.

Animals including humans naturally extrude exovesicles (also called exosomes and blebs by some) from multiple cell types including muscle and skin cells. These exovesicles are natural nanoparticles the body produces, that have been shown to transport molecules from one cell to another and from one tissue or organ to another tissue or organ. Veritas Bio’s technology enables utilization of this delivery system to afford delivery to the liver and other organs, tissues and cells.

The new technology allows one to locally administer, to the skin or muscle, either the effector molecules or a DNA encoding the effector molecules. The molecules are then loaded by the transfected cell into exovesicles, which are extruded or shed from the cell and distributed to other cells in the body. The use of exovesicles to deliver RNA to target cells is a natural, safe and effective method of systemic delivery of RNA via a local delivery route of administration, without invoking the innate and adaptive immune responses to the delivery system. The exosomes can be targeted to specific cell types and tissues through the use of ligands as described in the patent.

A corresponding application has also been filed in Europe. Veritas Bio is in the process of filing continuing applications to cover various other indications including delivery to non-liver tissues, including immune cells, various types of therapeutic nucleic acid molecules and compositions in which RNA containing exovesicles are manufactured in producer cells in culture.

The Allowed Patent Application and the continuing applications are available for licensing from Veritas Bio, LLC. Andrew B. Peltzman, andrewp@veritasbiollc.com or 215-432-5503. Veritas Bio, LLC, Operations Facility: 225 Chimney Corner Lane, Suite 2001, Jupiter, FL 33458

  • August 2011
    • Somahlution, Inc. licenses Veritas Bio’s enabling RNAi technologies to for use in Transplant Medicine
  • August 2008
    • Veritas Bio, LLC acquires intellectual property rights to manufacture of antibiotic-free plasmid DNA and other nucleic acids.
  • August 2008
    • Veritas Bio, LLC acquires intellectual property rights to enabling technologies, for the delivery and production of si & sh RNAi’s, miRNA and mRNA.

Technology News & Publications

  • Short-Range Exosomal Transfer of Viral RNA from Infected Cells to Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Triggers Innate Immunity., Marle` ne Dreux,Urtzi Garaigorta, Bryan Boyd, Elodie De´ cembre, Josan Chung, Christina Whitten-Bauer, Stefan Wieland, and Francis V. Chisari. Cell Host & Microbe 12, 558–570, October 18, 2012.
  • Functional transfer of microRNA by exosomes, Willem Stoorvogel, Blood, 2012, vol. 119 no. 3, 646-648.
  • Unidirectional transfer of microRNA-loaded exosomes from T cells to antigen-presenting cells, María Mittelbrunn, Cristina Gutiérrez-Vázquez, Carolina Villarroya-Beltri, Susana González, Fátima Sánchez-Cabo, Manuel Ángel González, Antonio Bernad & Francisco Sánchez-Madrid (2011).
  • Exosomes: a new hope in RNAi delivery, Biotechniques, 06/02/2011, Vincent Shen.
  • Delivery of siRNA to the mouse brain by systemic injection of targeted exosomes. Alvarez-Erviti et al. Nature Biotechnology, vol:29 (4) 2011.
  • Exosome-mediated transfer of mRNAs and microRNAs is a novel mechanism of genetic exchange between cells. Valadi et. Al.  Nature Cell Biology, Vol:9 (6) 2007.
  • An exosome-based secretion pathway is responsible for protein export from Leishmania and communication with macrophages.  Silverman et.al., Journal of Cell Science. 123, 842-852. 2010.
  • Microvesicles: mediators of extracellular communication during cancer progression.  Muralidharan-Chari et.al. Journal of Cell Science, 123, 1603-1611, 2010.